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Wisdom From Leaders.

    See also the Sayings Of Clive

"He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

"In Germany they first came for the communists and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak up because is wasn’t a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn’t speak up because I was a protestant. Then they came for me and by that time no one was left to speak up." - Pastor Martin Miemoller

"The only difference between today’s slavery and that of the South is that in the South the plantation owners paid for the chains." - Allan keys

"You know, the fact of the matter is, there are images where five hundred or six hundred Jewish people would sit there with two German soldiers holding guns on them, and leading them into a German prison camp. If people would only rise up, and take control of their own lives we cannot be coerced like this. What I think we need to do is mobilize people; utilize the training that our two-post war generations are the most widely educated educations in the history of our human family. We don't have to sit back and wait for someone like the king, or the pope, or someone like this to tell us this information. We can get this information ourselves, if we are willing to take the responsibility ourselves." - Daniel Sheehan.

"God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion . . . the tree of Liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants. it is it's natural manure." - Thomas Jefferson writing to William Smith (1755-1816), John Adams' secretary and future son-in-law, regarding the Shays' Rebellion in Massachusetts.

The biggest blunder in history is the ignorance of history. infowars.com rense.com

Among the natural rights of the colonists are these: First a right to life, secondly to liberty, and thirdly to property; together with the right to defend them in the best manner they can.
Samuel Adams

He who is void of virtuous attachments in private life is, or very soon will be, void of all regard for his country. There is seldom an instance of a man guilty of betraying his country, who had not before lost the feeling of moral obligations in his private connections.
Samuel Adams

How strangely will the Tools of a Tyrant pervert the plain Meaning of Words!
Samuel Adams

It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds.
Samuel Adams

It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.
Samuel Adams

Mankind are governed more by their feelings than by reason.
Samuel Adams

Our contest is not only whether we ourselves shall be free, but whether there shall be left to mankind an asylum on earth for civil and religious liberty.
Samuel Adams

The Constitution shall never be construed... to prevent the people of the United States who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms.
Samuel Adams

The liberties of our country, the freedom of our civil constitution, are worth defending against all hazards: And it is our duty to defend them against all attacks.
Samuel Adams

The natural liberty of man is to be free from any superior power on Earth, and not to be under the will or legislative authority of man, but only to have the law of nature for his rule.
Samuel Adams

We cannot make events. Our business is wisely to improve them.
Samuel Adams

"People need dramatic examples to shake them out of apathy." - billionaire Bruce Wayne

"The money powers prey upon the nation in times of peace and conspire against it in times of adversity. The banking powers are more despotic than a monarchy, more insolent than autocracy, more selfish than bureaucracy. They denounce as public enemies all who question their methods or throw light upon their crimes. I have two great enemies, the Southern Army in front of me and the bankers in the rear. Of the two, the one at my rear is my greatest foe." Abraham Lincoln

“No matter how paranoid you are, what they’re actually doing is worse than you can possibly imagine!” --Ralph J. Gleason

"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

"remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon & pacify them." - Thomas Jefferson

"The real menace of our Republic is the invisible government which like a giant octopus sprawls its slimy legs over our cities, states and nation. At the head is a small group of banking houses... This little coterie...run our government for their own selfish ends. It operates under cover of a self-created screen...seizes...our executive officers...legislative bodies...schools... courts...newspapers and every agency created for the public protection.” N.Y. Mayor, John Hylan

"If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy." - James Madison (1751-1836), 4th U.S. President and author of the U.S. Constitution

"When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe" - Thomas Jefferson

"'The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." - Thomas Jefferson

"It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if he acted on would save one-half the wars of the world." - Thomas Jefferson

"I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them." - Thomas Jefferson

"My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government." - Thomas Jefferson

"No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms."  - Thomas Jefferson

"The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.'  - Thomas Jefferson

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."  - Thomas Jefferson

"'To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical."  - Thomas Jefferson

"I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered."  - Thomas Jefferson

“A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks.” Thomas Jefferson

"When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross." Sinclair Lewis, It Can't Happen Here, 1935

"If you love wealth more than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chain be set lightly upon you and may posterity forget ye were our countrymen." Samuel Adams

"Civil disobedience is not our problem. Our problem is civil obedience. Our problem is that numbers of people all over the world have obeyed the dictates of the leaders of their government and have gone to war, and millions have been killed because of this obedience. Our problem is that people are obedient all over the world in the face of poverty and starvation and stupidity, and war, and cruelty. Our problem is that people are obedient while the jails are full of petty thieves, and all the while the grand thieves are running and robbing the country. That's our problem." - Howard Zinn, from 'Failure to Quit'

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

“In the beginning of a change, the Patriot is a scarce man – brave – hated – scorned. When his cause succeeds, however, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a Patriot.” - Mark Twain

“When People fear their government, there is tyranny. When government fears the People, there is liberty.” - Jefferson

"All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent" -- Thomas Jefferson

"A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death." - Martin Luther King, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience, 1967

"It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me, and I think that's pretty important." - Martin Luther King, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience, 1967

"If a man hasn't discovered something that he will die for, he isn't fit to live." - Martin Luther King, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience, 1967

"Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. Hate multiplies hate, violence multiplies violence, and toughness multiplies toughness in a descending spiral of destruction." - Martin Luther King, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience, 1967

"Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice. Justice at its best is love correcting everything that stands against love." - Martin Luther King, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience, 1967

In regard to the war in Vietnam: “Let us understand: North Vietnam cannot defeat or humiliate the United States. Only Americans can do that.” Richard M. Nixon, 1969 - “The biggest lesson I learned from Vietnam is not to trust our own government statements. I had no idea until then that you could not rely on them.”   J. William Fulbright -  “The war in Vietnam poisons everything. It has disrupted the economy, envenomed our politics, hurt the alliance, divided our people...” James Reston - “Numbers have dehumanized us. Over breakfast coffee we read of 40,000 American dead in Vietnam. Instead of vomiting, we reach for the toast. Our morning rush through crowded streets is not to cry murder but to hit that trough before somebody else gobbles our share.” Dalton Trumbo, Introduction, Johnny Got His Gun, 1970. - But then let's not forget how profitable the war in Vietnam was for companies manufacturing military ordinance.

In regard to the Iraq war: "It's always other men and other men's children who must sacrifice life and limb for the reasons that make no sense, reasons that are said to be our patriotic duty to fight and die for."  Ron Paul, House of Representatives, September 8, 2005 - “Using the Oval office to cheat on your wife makes you a bad husband and an irresponsible leader. Using the Oval office to lead your troops into a war born of blatant deception makes you a murderer and a war criminal.” Jules Carlysle

"In order to rally people, governments need enemies. They want us to be afraid, to hate, so we will rally behind them. And if they do not have a real enemy, they will invent one in order to mobilize us.": Thich Nhat Hanh - Vietnamese monk, activist and writer.

"While the Bush administration spends hundreds of billions of dollars on an immoral and unjust war, millions of people across America are without basic healthcare, housing, education and jobs. More than a year after Hurricane Katrina, the people of New Orleans remain abandoned by an administration that was criminally negligent of its duty to provide for their well-being. Every day that Congress allows Bush and Cheney to continue to serve sends a clear message to America that they care more about politics than people." - Reverend Lennox Yearwood, president of Hip Hop Caucus

“Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years… Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrance's have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned with contempt from the foot of the throne…” Patrick Henry’s speech before Virginia House on March 23, 1775.

“Independence forever.” - John Adams' last public words as a toast for the celebration - of the fiftieth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence

"If the American people ever allow the banks to control the issuance of their currency, first by inflation, and then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property, until their children wake up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered. The issuing power of money should be taken from banks and restored to Congress and the people to whom it belongs. I sincerely believe the banking institutions having the issuing power of money, are more dangerous to liberty than standing armies." - Thomas Jefferson

"Those who make peaceful resolution impossible make violent resolution inevitable" John Kennedy

“The moment the idea is admitted into society that property is not as sacred as the laws of God, and that there is not a force of law and public justice to protect it, anarchy and tyranny commence. If 'Thou shalt not covet' and 'Thou shalt not steal' were not commandments of Heaven, they must be made inviolable precepts in every society before it can be civilized or made free.” - John Adams, A Defense of the American Constitutions, 1787

“[L]iberty must at all hazards be supported. We have a right to it, derived from our Maker. But if we had not, our fathers have earned and bought it for us, at the expense of their ease, their estates, their pleasure, and their blood.” - John Adams, A Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law, 1765

“[D]emocracy will soon degenerate into an anarchy, such an anarchy that every man will do what is right in his own eyes and no man's life or property or reputation or liberty will be secure, and every one of these will soon mould itself into a system of subordination of all the moral virtues and intellectual abilities, all the powers of wealth, beauty, wit and science, to the wanton pleasures, the capricious will, and the execrable cruelty of one or a very few.” - John Adams, An Essay on Man's Lust for Power, 1763

“Children should be educated and instructed in the principles of freedom.” - John Adams, Defense of the Constitutions, 1787

“It should be your care, therefore, and mine, to elevate the minds of our children and exalt their courage; to accelerate and animate their industry and activity; to excite in them an habitual contempt of meanness, abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity, and an ambition to excel in every capacity, faculty, and virtue. If we suffer their minds to grovel and creep in infancy, they will grovel all their lives.” - John Adams, Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law, 1756

“Let the pulpit resound with the doctrine and sentiments of religious liberty. Let us hear of the dignity of man's nature, and the noble rank he holds among the works of God... Let it be known that British liberties are not the grants of princes and parliaments.” - John Adams, Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law, 1765

“Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right, from the frame of their nature, to knowledge, as their great Creator, who does nothing in vain, has given them understandings, and a desire to know; but besides this, they have a right, an indisputable, unalienable, indefeasible, divine right to that most dreaded and envied kind of knowledge; I mean, of the characters and conduct of their rulers.” - John Adams, Dissertation on the Canon and Feudal Law, 1765

“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclination, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” - John Adams, in Defense of the British Soldiers on trial for the Boston Massacre, 1770

“But a Constitution of Government once changed from Freedom, can never be restored. Liberty once lost is lost forever.” - John Adams, letter to Abigail Adams, 1775

“I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study mathematics and philosophy, geography, natural history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture, statuary, tapestry, and porcelain.” - John Adams, letter to Abigail Adams, 1780

"Fear is never a good enough reason to do nothing" – Charlie Scheen, Actor

“It has ever been my hobby-horse to see rising in America an empire of liberty, and a prospect of two or three hundred millions of freemen, without one noble or one king among them. You say it is impossible. If I should agree with you in this, I would still say, let us try the experiment, and preserve our equality as long as we can.” - John Adams, letter to Count Sarsfield, February 3, 1786

“Let justice be done though the heavens should fall.” - John Adams, letter to Elbridge Gerry, December 5, 1777

“Men must be ready, they must pride themselves and be happy to sacrifice their private pleasures, passions and interests, nay, their private friendships and dearest connections, when they stand in competition with the rights of society.” - John Adams, letter to Mercy Warren, April 16, 1776

“The dons, the bashaws, the grandees, the patricians, the sachems, the nabobs, call them by what names you please, sigh and groan and fret, and sometimes stamp and foam and curse, but all in vain. The decree is gone forth, and it cannot be recalled, that a more equal liberty than has prevailed in other parts of the earth must be established in America.” - John Adams, letter to Patrick Henry, June 3, 1776

“Objects of the most stupendous magnitude, and measure in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn are intimately interested, are now before us. We are in the very midst of a revolution the most complete, unexpected and remarkable of any in the history of nations.” - John Adams, letter to William Cushing, June 9, 1776

“They define a republic to be a government of laws, and not of men.” - John Adams, Nocangul No. 7, 1775

“The committee met, discussed the subject, [of the Declaration of Independence] and then appointed Mr. Jefferson and me to make the draught, I suppose because we were the two first on the list. The subcommittee met. Jefferson proposed to me to make the draught. Adams: I will not. Jefferson: You should do it. Adams: Oh! no. Jefferson: Why will you not? You ought to do it. Adams: I will not. Jefferson: Why? Adams: Reasons enough. Jefferson: What can be your reasons? Adams: Reason first -- You are a Virginian, and a Virginian ought to appear at the head of this business. Reason second -- I am obnoxious, suspected and unpopular. You are very much otherwise. Reason third -- You can write ten times better than I can. Jefferson: Well if you are decided, I will do as well as I can. Adams: Very well. When you have drawn it up, we will have a meeting.” - John Adams, on the drafting of the Declaration of Independence

“If men through fear, fraud or mistake, should in terms renounce and give up any essential natural right, the eternal law of reason and the great end of society, would absolutely vacate such renunciation; the right to freedom being the gift of God Almighty, it is not in the power of Man to alienate this gift, and voluntarily become a slave.” - John Adams, Rights of the Colonists, 1772

“Human nature itself is evermore an advocate for liberty. There is also in human nature a resentment of injury, and indignation against wrong. A love of truth and a veneration of virtue. These amiable passions, are the "latent spark" ... If the people are capable of understanding, seeing and feeling the differences between true and false, right and wrong, virtue and vice, to what better principle can the friends of mankind apply than to the sense of this difference.” - John Adams, the Novanglus, 1775

“[J]udges, therefore, should be always men of learning and experience in the laws, of exemplary morals, great patience, calmness, coolness, and attention. Their minds should not be distracted with jarring interests; they should not be dependent upon any man, or body of men.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“A constitution founded on these principles introduces knowledge among the people, and inspires them with a conscious dignity becoming freemen; a general emulation takes place, which causes good humor, sociability, good manners, and good morals to be general. That elevation of sentiment inspired by such a government, makes the common people brave and enterprising. That ambition which is inspired by it makes them sober, industrious, and frugal.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“As good government is an empire of laws, how shall your laws be made? In a large society, inhabiting an extensive country, it is impossible that the whole should assemble to make laws. The first necessary step, then, is to depute power from the many to a few of the most wise and good.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and property, according to standing laws. He is obliged, consequently, to contribute his share to the expense of this protection; and to give his personal service, or an equivalent, when necessary. But no part of the property of any individual can, with justice, be taken from him, or applied to public uses, without his own consent, or that of the representative body of the people. In fine, the people of this commonwealth are not controllable by any other laws than those to which their constitutional representative body have given their consent.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“Fear is the foundation of most governments; but it is so sordid and brutal a passion, and renders men in whose breasts it predominates so stupid and miserable, that Americans will not be likely to approve of any political institution which is founded on it.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.” - John Adams, Article VII, Massachusetts Constitution

“That, as a republic is the best of governments, so that particular arrangements of the powers of society, or, in other words, that form of government which is best contrived to secure an impartial and exact execution of the laws, is the best of republics.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“The dignity and stability of government in all its branches, the morals of the people, and every blessing of society depend so much upon an upright and skillful administration of justice, that the judicial power ought to be distinct from both the legislative and executive, and independent upon both, that so it may be a check upon both, and both should be checks upon that.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“Upon this point all speculative politicians will agree, that the happiness of society is the end of government, as all divines and moral philosophers will agree that the happiness of the individual is the end of man. From this principle it will follow that the form of government which communicates ease, comfort, security, or, in one word, happiness, to the greatest numbers of persons, and in the greatest degree, is the best.” - John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

“I have accepted a seat in the [Massachusetts] House of Representatives, and thereby have consented to my own ruin, to your ruin, and the ruin of our children. I give you this warning, that you may prepare your mind for your fate.” - John Adams, to Abigail Adams, 1770

“What is it that affectionate parents require of their Children; for all their care, anxiety, and toil on their accounts? Only that they would be wise and virtuous, Benevolent and kind.” - Abigail Adams, letter to John Quincy Adams, November 20, 1783

“[N]either the wisest constitution nor the wisest laws will secure the liberty and happiness of a people whose manners are universally corrupt.” - Samuel Adams, essay in The Public Advertiser, 1749

“No people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffusd and Virtue is preservd. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauchd in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders.” - Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, 1775

“Nothing is more essential to the establishment of manners in a State than that all persons employed in places of power and trust must be men of unexceptionable characters.” - Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, 1775

“The public cannot be too curious concerning the characters of public men.” - Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, 1775

“Our unalterable resolution would be to be free. They have attempted to subdue us by force, but God be praised! in vain. Their arts may be more dangerous then their arms. Let us then renounce all treaty with them upon any score but that of total separation, and under God trust our cause to our swords.” - Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, April 16, 1776

“A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue then will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.” - Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, February 12, 1779

“What a glorious morning this is!” - Samuel Adams, to John Hancock at the Battle of Lexington, 1775

History affords us many instances of the ruin of states, by the prosecution of measures ill suited to the temper and genius of their people. The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy... These measures never fail to create great and violent jealousies and animosities between the people favored and the people oppressed; whence a total separation of affections, interests, political obligations, and all manner of connections, by which the whole state is weakened.” - Benjamin Franklin

“I pronounce it as certain that there was never yet a truly great man that was not at the same time truly virtuous.” - Benjamin Franklin

“No nation was ever ruined by trade, even seemingly the most disadvantageous.” - Benjamin Franklin and George Whaley, Principles of Trade, 1774

“We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.” - Benjamin Franklin, (attributed) at the signing of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776

“Early to bed, early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.” - Benjamin Franklin, Advice to Young Tradesman, 1748

“Slavery is such an atrocious debasement of human nature, that its very extirpation, if not performed with solicitous care, may sometimes open a source of serious evils.” - Benjamin Franklin, An Address to the Public, November, 1789

“Human Felicity is produced not so much by great Pieces of good Fortune that seldom happen, as by little Advantages that occur every Day.” - Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography, 1771

“In reality there is perhaps no one of our natural Passions so hard to subdue as Pride. Disguise it, struggle with it, beat it down, stifle it, mortify it as much as one pleases, it is still alive, and will now and then peek out and show itself.” - Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography, 1771

“Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve.” - Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography, 1771

“This gave me occasion to observe, that when Men are employ'd they are best contented. For on the Days they work'd they were good-natur'd and chearful; and with the consciousness of having done a good Days work they spent the Evenings jollily; but on the idle Days they were mutinous and quarrelsome, finding fault with their Pork, the Bread, &c. and in continual ill-humour.” - Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography, 1771

“The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy.” - Benjamin Franklin, Emblematical Representations, 1774

“He that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing.” - Benjamin Franklin, from his writings, 1758

“They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.” - Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

“Where liberty dwells, there is my country.” - Benjamin Franklin, letter to Benjamin Vaughn, March 14, 1783

“Repeal that [welfare] law, and you will soon see a change in their manners. St. Monday and St. Tuesday, will soon cease to be holidays. Six days shalt thou labor, though one of the old commandments long treated as out of date, will again be looked upon as a respectable precept; industry will increase, and with it plenty among the lower people; their circumstances will mend, and more will be done for their happiness by inuring them to provide for themselves, than could be done by dividing all your estates among them.” - Benjamin Franklin, letter to Collinson, 1753

“Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” - Benjamin Franklin, letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy, November 13, 1789

“Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy.” - Benjamin Franklin, letter to John Alleyne, 1768

“[I]t is a common observation here that our cause is the cause of all mankind, and that we are fighting for their liberty in defending our own.” - Benjamin Franklin, letter to Samuel Cooper, May 1, 1777

“[E]very Man who comes among us, and takes up a piece of Land, becomes a Citizen, and by our Constitution has a Voice in Elections, and a share in the Government of the Country.” - Benjamin Franklin, letter to William Straham, 1784

“I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.” - Benjamin Franklin, On the Price of Corn and Management of the Poor, 1766

“It is very imprudent to deprive America of any of her privileges. If her commerce and friendship are of any importance to you, they are to be had on no other terms than leaving her in the full enjoyment of her rights.” - Benjamin Franklin, Political Observations

“A penny saved is twopence clear.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack

“Have you something to do to-morrow; do it to-day.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack

“Here comes the orator! With his flood of words, and his drop of reason.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack

“Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, half shut afterwards.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack

“Strive to be the greatest man in your country, and you may be disappointed. Strive to be the best and you may succeed: he may well win the race that runs by himself.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack

“A fine genius in his own country is like gold in the mine.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack, 1733

“How many observe Christ's birth-day! How few, his precepts! O! 'tis easier to keep Holidays than Commandments.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richards Almanack, 1743

“Wish not so much to live long as to live well.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack, 1746

“A Spoonful of Honey will catch more Flies than a Gallon of Vinager.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack, 1748

“Having been poor is no shame, but being ashamed of it, is.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richards Almanack, 1749

“Work as if you were to live 100 Years, Pray as if you were to die To-morrow.” - Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack, 1757

“And as to the Cares, they are chiefly what attend the bringing up of Children; and I would ask any Man who has experienced it, if they are not the most delightful Cares in the World; and if from that Particular alone, he does not find the Bliss of a double State much greater, instead of being less than he expected.” - Benjamin Franklin, Reply to a Piece of Advice, 1735

“To the haranguers of the populace among the ancients, succeed among the moderns your writers of political pamphlets and news-papers, and your coffee-house talkers.” - Benjamin Franklin, Reply to Coffee House Orators, 1767

“The happy State of Matrimony is, undoubtedly, the surest and most lasting Foundation of Comfort and Love; the Source of all that endearing Tenderness and Affection which arises from Relation and Affinity; the grand Point of Property; the Cause of all good Order in the World, and what alone preserves it from the utmost Confusion; and, to sum up all, the Appointment of infinite Wisdom for these great and good Purposes.” - Benjamin Franklin, Rules and Maxims for Promoting Matrimonial Happiness, 1730

“Strangers are welcome because there is room enough for them all, and therefore the old Inhabitants are not jealous of them; the Laws protect them sufficiently so that they have no need of the Patronage of great Men; and every one will enjoy securely the Profits of his Industry. But if he does not bring a Fortune with him, he must work and be industrious to live.” - Benjamin Franklin, Those Who Would Remove to America, February, 1784

“Without Freedom of Thought there can be no such Thing as Wisdom; and no such Thing as Public Liberty, without Freedom of Speech.” - Benjamin Franklin, writing as Silence Dogood, No. 8, 1722

[H]owever weak our country may be, I hope we shall never sacrifice our liberties.” - Alexander Hamilton

“As on the one hand, the necessity for borrowing in particular emergencies cannot be doubted, so on the other, it is equally evident that to be able to borrow upon good terms, it is essential that the credit of a nation should be well established.” - Alexander Hamilton

“No man in his senses can hesitate in choosing to be free, rather than a slave.” - Alexander Hamilton, 1774

“Experience is the oracle of truth; and where its responses are unequivocal, they ought to be conclusive and sacred.” - Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, Federalist No. 20, December 11, 1787

“In politics, as in religion, it is equally absurd to aim at making proselytes by fire and sword. Heresies in either can rarely be cured by persecution.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 1, October 27, 1787

“Of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people, commencing demagogues and ending tyrants.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 1, October 27, 1787

“The fabric of American empire ought to rest on the solid basis of THE CONSENT OF THE PEOPLE. The streams of national power ought to flow from that pure, original fountain of all legitimate authority.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 22, December 14, 1787

“In disquisitions of every kind there are certain primary truths, or first principles, upon which all subsequent reasoning must depend.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 31, January 1, 1788

“To judge from the history of mankind, we shall be compelled to conclude that the fiery and destructive passions of war reign in the human breast with much more powerful sway than the mild and beneficent sentiments of peace; and that to model our political systems upon speculations of lasting tranquillity would be to calculate on the weaker springs of human character.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788

“It is a just observation that the people commonly intend the Public Good. This often applies to their very errors. But their good sense would despise the adulator who should pretend they always reason right about the means of promoting it.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 71, March 18, 1788

“[T]he Constitution ought to be the standard of construction for the laws, and that wherever there is an evident opposition, the laws ought to give place to the Constitution. But this doctrine is not deducible from any circumstance peculiar to the plan of convention, but from the general theory of a limited Constitution.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 81, 1788

“The truth is, after all the declamations we have heard, that the Constitution is itself, in every rational sense, and to every useful purpose, A BILL OF RIGHTS.” - Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 84, 1788

“The State governments possess inherent advantages, which will ever give them an influence and ascendancy over the National Government, and will for ever preclude the possibility of federal encroachments. That their liberties, indeed, can be subverted by the federal head, is repugnant to every rule of political calculation.” - Alexander Hamilton, speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788

“While the constitution continues to be read, and its principles known, the states, must, by every, rational man, be considered as essential component parts of the union; and therefore the idea of sacrificing the former to the latter is totally inadmissible.” - Alexander Hamilton, speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 24, 1788

“It is an unquestionable truth, that the body of the people in every country desire sincerely its prosperity. But it is equally unquestionable that they do not possess the discernment and stability necessary for systematic government. To deny that they are frequently led into the grossest of errors, by misinformation and passion, would be a flattery which their own good sense must despise.” - Alexander Hamilton, speech to the Ratifying Convention of New York, June, 1788

“When you assemble from your several counties in the Legislature, were every member to be guided only by the apparent interest of his county, government would be impracticable. There must be a perpetual accomodation and sacrifice of local advantage to general expediency.” - Alexander Hamilton, speech to the Ratifying Convention of New York, June, 1788

“A fondness for power is implanted, in most men, and it is natural to abuse it, when acquired.” - Alexander Hamilton, The Farmer Refuted, 1775

“The fundamental source of all your errors, sophisms and false reasonings is a total ignorance of the natural rights of mankind. Were you once to become acquainted with these, you could never entertain a thought, that all men are not, by nature, entitled to a parity of privileges. You would be convinced, that natural liberty is a gift of the beneficent Creator to the whole human race, and that civil liberty is founded in that; and cannot be wrested from any people, without the most manifest violation of justice.” - Alexander Hamilton, The Farmer Refuted, 1775

“There is a certain enthusiasm in liberty, that makes human nature rise above itself, in acts of bravery and heroism.” - Alexander Hamilton, The Farmer Refuted, 1775

“To grant that there is a supreme intelligence who rules the world and has established laws to regulate the actions of his creatures; and still to assert that man, in a state of nature, may be considered as perfectly free from all restraints of law and government, appears to a common understanding altogether irreconcilable. Good and wise men, in all ages, have embraced a very dissimilar theory. They have supposed that the deity, from the relations we stand in to himself and to each other, has constituted an eternal and immutable law, which is indispensably obligatory upon all mankind, prior to any human institution whatever. This is what is called the law of nature....Upon this law depend the natural rights of mankind.” - Alexander Hamilton, The Farmer Refuted, 1775

“When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests, to withstand the temporary delusion, in order to give them time and opportunity for more cool and sedate reflection.” - Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist, no 71

“Patriotism is as much a virtue as justice, and is as necessary for the support of societies as natural affection is for the support of families.” - Benjamin Rush, 1773

“The American war is over; but this far from being the case with the American revolution. On the contrary, nothing but the first act of the drama is closed. It remains yet to establish and perfect our new forms of government, and to prepare the principles, morals, and manners of our citizens for these forms of government after they are established and brought to perfection.” - Benjamin Rush, May 25, 1786

“[I]f the public are bound to yield obedience to laws to which they cannot give their approbation, they are slaves to those who make such laws and enforce them.” - Candidus in the Boston Gazette, 1772

“Don't fire unless fired upon. But if they want a war let it begin here.” - Captain John Parker, commander of the militiamen at Lexington, Massachusetts, April 19, 1775

“Under all those disadvantages no men ever show more spirit or prudence than ours. In my opinion nothing but virtue has kept our army together through this campaign.” - Colonel John Brooks, letter to a friend, January 5, 1778

“Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us. We cannot endure the infamy and guilt of resigning succeeding generations to that wretchedness which inevitably awaits them if we basely entail hereditary bondage on them.” - Continental Congress Declaration, 1775

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and pursuit of Happiness: that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” - Declaration of Independence

“When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the Powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which they Law of Nature and Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.” - Declaration of Independence

“[W]hereas, to preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them; nor does it follow from this, that all promiscuously must go into actual service on every occasion. The mind that aims at a select militia, must be influenced by a truly anti-republican principle; and when we see many men disposed to practice upon it, whenever they can prevail, no wonder true republicans are for carefully guarding against it.” - Federal Farmer, Antifederalist Letter, No.18, January 25, 1778

“Every new regulation concerning commerce or revenue; or in any manner affecting the value of the different species of property, presents a new harvest to those who watch the change and can trace its consequences; a harvest reared not by themselves but by the toils and cares of the great body of their fellow citizens. This is a state of things in which it may be said with some truth that laws are made for the few not for the many.” - Federalist No. 62, 1788

“It will be of little avail to the people that the laws are made by men of their own choice, if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood; if they be repealed or revised before they are promulgated, or undergo such incessant changes that no man who knows what the law is today can guess what it will be to-morrow.” - Federalist No. 62, 1788

“The known propensity of a democracy is to licentiousness which the ambitious call, and ignorant believe to be liberty.” - Fisher Ames, speech in the Massachusetts Ratifying Convention, January 15, 1788

“We are not to consider ourselves, while here, as at church or school, to listen to the harangues of speculative piety; we are here to talk of the political interests committed to our charge.” - Fisher Ames, speech in the United States House of Representatives, 1789

“[W]hen the resolution of enslaving America was formed in Great Britain, the British Parliament was advised by an artful man, -- who was governor of Pennsylvania, to disarm the people; that it was the best and most effectual way to enslave them; but that they should not do it openly, but weaken them, and let them sink gradually, by totally disusing and neglecting the militia.” - George Mason, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 14, 1778

“Nothing so strongly impels a man to regard the interest of his constituents, as the certainty of returning to the general mass of the people, from whence he was taken, where he must participate in their burdens.” - George Mason, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788

“To be prepared for war, is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.” - George Washington

“Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of Action; and bidding an Affectionate farewell to this August body under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life.” - George Washington, Address to Congress on Resigning his Commission, December 23, 1783

“The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respectable Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment.” - George Washington, Address to the Members of the Volunteer Association of Ireland, December 2, 1783

“When we assumed the Soldier, we did not lay aside the Citizen; and we shall most sincerely rejoice with you in the happy hour when the establishment of American Liberty, upon the most firm and solid foundations shall enable us to return to our Private Stations in the bosom of a free, peacefully and happy Country.” - George Washington, address to the New York Legislature, 1775

“It is too probable that no plan we propose will be adopted. Perhaps another dreadful conflict is to be sustained. If, to please the people, we offer what we ourselves disprove, how can we afterwards defend our work? Let us raise a standard to which the wise and the honest can repair. The event is in the hand of God.” - George Washington, as quoted by Gouverneur Morris in Farrand's Records of the Federal Convention of 1787

“[H]onesty will be found on every experiment, to be the best and only true policy; let us then as a Nation be just.” - George Washington, Circular letter to the States, June 14, 1783

“For myself the delay [in assuming the office of the President] may be compared with a reprieve; for in confidence I assure you, with the world it would obtain little credit that my movements to the chair of Government will be accompanied by feelings not unlike those of a culprit who is going to the place of his execution: so unwilling am I, in the evening of a life nearly consumed in public cares, to quit a peaceful abode for an Ocean of difficulties, without that competency of political skill, abilities and inclination which is necessary to manage the helm.” - George Washington, comment to General Henry Knox, March, 1789

“I rejoice in a belief that intellectual light will spring up in the dark corners of the earth; that freedom of enquiry will produce liberality of conduct; that mankind will reverse the absurd position that the many were, made for the few; and that they will not continue slaves in one part of the globe, when they can become freemen in another.” - George Washington, draft of First Inaugural Address, April 1789

“The preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered deeply, perhaps as finally, staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people.” - George Washington, First Inaugural Address, 1789

“The hour is fast approaching, on which the Honor and Success of this army, and the safety of our bleeding Country depend. Remember officers and Soldiers, that you are Freemen, fighting for the blessings of Liberty -- that slavery will be your portion, and that of your posterity, if you do not acquit yourselves like men.” - George Washington, General Orders, August 23, 1776

“Our own Country's Honor, all call upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions -- The Eyes of all our Countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings, and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the Tyranny mediated against them. Let us therefore animate and encourage each other, and shew the whole world, that a Freeman contending for Liberty on his own ground is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.” - George Washington, General Orders, July 2, 1776

“No country upon earth ever had it more in its power to attain these blessings than United America. Wondrously strange, then, and much to be regretted indeed would it be, were we to neglect the means and to depart from the road which Providence has pointed us to so plainly; I cannot believe it will ever come to pass.” - George Washington, letter to Benjamin Lincoln, June 29, 1788

“I have always considered marriage as the most interesting event of one's life, the foundation of happiness or misery.” - George Washington, letter to Burwell Bassett, May 1785

“All see, and most admire, the glare which hovers round the external trappings of elevated office. To me there is nothing in it, beyond the lustre which may be reflected from its connection with a power of promoting human felicity.” - George Washington, letter to Catherine MacAuly Graham

“In our progress toward political happiness my station is new; and if I may use the expression, I walk on untrodden ground. There is scarcely any part of my conduct wch. may not hereafter be drawn into precedent.” - George Washington, letter to Catherine MacAuly Graham

“[L]et the poor the needy and oppressed of the Earth, and those who want Land, resort to the fertile plains of our western country, the second land of Promise, and there dwell in peace, fulfilling the first and great commandment.” - George Washington, letter to David Humphreys, July 25, 1785

“I can truly say I had rather be at Mount Vernon with a friend or two about me, than to be attended at the Seat of Government by the Officers of State and the Representatives of every Power in Europe.” - George Washington, letter to David Stuart

“Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.” - George Washington, letter to James Madison, March 2, 1788

“To form a new Government, requires infinite care, and unbounded attention; for if the foundation is badly laid the superstructure must be bad.” - George Washington, letter to John Augustine Washington, May 31, 1776

“We must take human nature as we find it, perfection falls not to the share of mortals.” - George Washington, letter to John Jay, August 15, 1786

“It appears to me, then, little short of a miracle, that the Delegates from so many different States ... should unite in forming a system of national Government, so little liable to well founded objections.” - George Washington, letter to Marquis de Lafayette, February 7, 1788

“[Y]our late purchase of an estate in the colony of Cayenne, with a view to emancipating the slaves on it, is a generous and noble proof of your humanity. Would to God a like spirit would diffuse itself generally into the minds of the people of this country; but I despair of seeing it.” - George Washington, letter to Marquis de Lafayette, May 10, 1786

“Next Monday the Convention in Virginia will assemble; we have still good hopes of its adoption here: though by no great plurality of votes. South Carolina has probably decided favourably before this time. The plot thickens fast. A few short weeks will determine the political fate of America for the present generation, and probably produce no small influence on the happiness of society through a long succession of ages to come.” - George Washington, letter to Marquis de Lafayette, May 28, 1788

“My ardent desire is, and my aim has been ... to comply strictly with all our engagements foreign and domestic; but to keep the U States free from political connections with every other Country. To see that they may be independent of all, and under the influence of none. In a word, I want an American character, that the powers of Europe may be convinced we act for ourselves and not for others; this, in my judgment, is the only way to be respected abroad and happy at home.” - George Washington, letter to Partick Henry, 1775

“We should never despair, our Situation before has been unpromising and has changed for the better, so I trust, it will again. If new difficulties arise, we must only put forth new Exertions and proportion our Efforts to the exigency of the times.” - George Washington, letter to Philip Schuyler, July 15, 1777

“The citizens of the United States of America have the right to applaud themselves for having given to mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of as if it were by the indulgence of one class of citizens that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights, for happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.” - George Washington, letter to the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island

“It should be the highest ambition of every American to extend his views beyond himself, and to bear in mind that his conduct will not only affect himself, his country, and his immediate posterity; but that its influence may be co-extensive with the world, and stamp political happiness or misery on ages yet unborn.” - George Washington, letter to the Legislature of Pennsylvania, September 5, 1789

“[M]ore permanent and genuine happiness is to be found in the sequestered walks of connubial life than in the giddy rounds of promiscuous pleasure.” - George Washington, letter to the Marquis de la Rourie, August 10, 1786

“The establishment of Civil and Religious Liberty was the Motive which induced me to the Field -- the object is attained -- and it now remains to be my earnest wish & prayer, that the Citizens of the United States could make a wise and virtuous use of the blessings placed before them.” - George Washington, letter to the Reformed German Congregation of New York City, November 27, 1783

“Your love of liberty -- your respect for the laws -- your habits of industry -- and your practice of the moral and religious obligations, are the strongest claims to national and individual happiness.” - George Washington, letter to the Residents of Boston, October 27, 1789

“Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire caled conscience.” - George Washington, The Rules of Civility

“Gentlemen, you will permit me to put on my spectacles, for, I have grown not only gray, but almost blind in the service of my country.” - George Washington, upon fumbling for his glasses before delivering the Newburgh Address, March 15, 1783

[W]e are confirmed in the opinion, that the present age would be deficient in their duty to God, their posterity and themselves, if they do not establish an American republic. This is the only form of government we wish to see established; for we can never be willingly subject to any other King than He who, being possessed of infinite wisdom, goodness and rectitude, is alone fit to possess unlimited power.” - Instructions of Malden, Massachusettes for a Declaration of Independence, May 27, 1776

“Every man who loves peace, every man who loves his country, every man who loves liberty ought to have it ever before his eyes that he may cherish in his heart a due attachment to the Union of America and be able to set a due value on the means of preserving it.” - James Madison

“The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite.” - James Madison

“It becomes all therefore who are friends of a Government based on free principles to reflect, that by denying the possibility of a system partly federal and partly consolidated, and who would convert ours into one either wholly federal or wholly consolidated, in neither of which forms have individual rights, public order, and external safety, been all duly maintained, they aim a deadly blow at the last hope of true liberty on the face of the Earth.” - James Madison” - “[D]emocracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security, or the rights of property; and have, in general, been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 10, November 23, 1787

“The apportionment of taxes on the various descriptions of property is an act which seems to require the most exact impartiality; yet there is, perhaps, no legislative act in which greater opportunity and temptation are given to a predominant party to trample on the rules of justice. Every shilling which they overburden the inferior number is a shilling saved to their own pockets.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 10, November 23, 1787

“The diversity in the faculties of men from which the rights of property originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to a uniformity of interests. The protection of these faculties is the first object of government.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 10, November 23, 1787

“Is it not the glory of the people of America, that whilst they have paid a decent regard to the opinions of former times and other nations, they have not suffered a blind veneration for antiquity, for custom, or for names, to overrule the suggestions of their own good sense, the knowledge of their own situation, and the lessons of their own experience? To this manly spirit, posterity will be indebted for the possession, and the world for the example of the numerous innovations displayed on the American theatre, in favor of private rights and public happiness.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 14, November 30, 1787

“If we resort for a criterion to the different principles on which different forms of government are established, we may define a republic to be, or at least may bestow that name on, a government which derives all its powers directly or indirectly from the great body of the people, and is administered by persons holding their offices during pleasure for a limited period, or during good behavior.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 39

“It is too early for politicians to presume on our forgetting that the public good, the real welfare of the great body of the people, is the supreme object to be pursued; and that no form of government whatever has any other value than as it may be fitted for the attainment of this object.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 45

“We have heard of the impious doctrine in the old world, that the people were made for kings, not kings for the people. Is the same doctrine to be revived in the new, in another shape -- that the solid happiness of the people is to be sacrificed to the views of political institutions of a different form? It is too early for politicians to presume on our forgetting that the public good, the real welfare of the great body of the people, is the supreme object to be pursued; and that no form of government whatever has any other value than as it may be fitted for the attainment of this object.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 45

“A local spirit will infallibly prevail much more in the members of Congress than a national spirit will prevail in the legislatures of the particular States.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 46, January 29, 1788

“The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 48, February 1, 1788

“A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 51

“If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place, oblige it to control itself.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 51, February 8, 1788

“As there is a degree of depravity in mankind which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust: So there are other qualities in human nature, which justify a certain portion of esteem and confidence. Republican government presupposes the existence of these qualities in a higher degree than any other form. Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us, faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be that there is not sufficient virtue among men for self-government; and that nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 55, February 15, 1788

“Had every Athenian citizen been a Socrates, every Athenian assembly would still have been a mob.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 55, February 15, 1788

“An elective despotism was not the government we fought for; but one in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among the several bodies of magistracy as that no one could transcend their legal limits without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.” - James Madison, Federalist No. 58, 1788

“Nothing is so contagious as opinion, especially on questions which, being susceptible of very different glosses, beget in the mind a distrust of itself.” - James Madison, letter to Benjamin Rush

“Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression.” - James Madison, letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 17, 1788

“Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprise, every expanded prospect.” - James Madison, letter to William Bradford, 1774

“All men having power ought to be distrusted to a certain degree.” - James Madison, speech at the Constitutional Convention, July 11, 1787

“We have seen the mere distinction of color made in the most enlightened period of time, a ground of the most oppressive dominion ever exercised by man over man.” - James Madison, speech at the Constitutional Convention, June 6, 1787

“Is there no virtue among us? If there be not, we are in a wretched situation. No theoretical checks -- no form of government can render us secure. To suppose that any form of government will secure liberty or happiness without any virtue in the people, is a chimerical idea, if there be sufficient virtue and intelligence in the community, it will be exercised in the selection of these men. So that we do not depend on their virtue, or put confidence in our rulers, but in the people who are to choose them.” - James Madison, speech at the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 20, 1788

“I acknowledge, in the ordinary course of government, that the exposition of the laws and Constitution devolves upon the Judiciary. But I beg to know upon what principle it can be contended that any one department draws from the Constitution greater powers than another in marking out the limits of the powers of the several departments.” - James Madison, speech in the Congress of the United States, 1789

“There are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.” - James Madison, speech to the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 16, 1788

“How prone all human institutions have been to decay; how subject the best-formed and most wisely organized governments have been to lose their check and totally dissolve; how difficult it has been for mankind, in all ages and countries, to preserve their dearest rights and best privileges, impelled as it were by an irresistible fate of despotism.” - James Monroe, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 10, 1788

“One of the most essential branches of English liberty is the freedom of one's house. A man's house is his castle.” - James Otis, On the Writs of Assistance, 1761

“Government, in my humble opinion, should be formed to secure and to enlarge the exercise of the natural rights of its members; and every government, which has not this in view, as its principal object, is not a government of the legitimate kind.” - James Wilson, Lectures on Law, 1791

“With hearts fortified with these animating reflections, we most solemnly, before God and the world, declare, that, exerting the utmost energy of those powers, which our beneficent Creator hath graciously bestowed upon us, the arms we have compelled by our enemies to assume, we will, in defiance of every hazard, with unabating firmness and perseverance employ for the preservation of our liberties; being with one mind resolved to die freemen rather than to live as slaves.” - John Dickinson and Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of the Cause and Necessity of Taking up Arms, July 6, 1775

“There! His Majesty can now read my name without glasses. And he can double the reward on my head!” - John Hancock, upon signing the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776

“But the safety of the people of America against dangers from foreign force depends not only on their forbearing to give just causes of war to other nations, but also on their placing and continuing themselves in such a situation as not to invite hostility or insult; for it need not be observed that there are pretended as well as just causes of war.” - John Jay, Federalist No. 4

“Wisely, therefore, do they consider union and a good national government as necessary to put and keep them in such a situation as, instead of inviting war, will tend to repress and discourage it. That situation consists in the best possible state of defense, and necessarily depends on the government, the arms, and the resources of the country.” - John Jay, Federalist No. 4

“It is much to be wished that slavery may be abolished. The honour of the States, as well as justice and humanity, in my opinion, loudly call upon them to emancipate these unhappy people. To contend for our own liberty, and to deny that blessing to others, involves an inconsistency not to be excused.” - John Jay, letter to R. Lushington, March 15, 1786

“We know the Race is not to the swift nor the Battle to the Strong. Do you not think an Angel rides in the Whirlwind and directs this Storm?” - John Page, letter to Thomas Jefferson, July 20, 1776

“An honorable Peace is and always was my first wish! I can take no delight in the effusion of human Blood; but, if this War should continue, I wish to have the most active part in it.” - John Paul Jones, letter to Gouverneur Morris, September 2, 1782

“I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way.” - John Paul Jones, letter to M. Le Ray de Chaumont, November 16, 1778

“I have not yet begun to fight!” - John Paul Jones, response to enemy demand to surrender, September 23, 1779

“Nothing is more certain than that a general profligacy and corruption of manners make a people ripe for destruction. A good form of government may hold the rotten materials together for some time, but beyond a certain pitch, even the best constitution will be ineffectual, and slavery must ensue.” - John Witherspoon, The Dominion of Providence Over the Passions of Men, 1776

“There is not a single instance in history in which civil liberty was lost, and religious liberty preserved entire. If therefore we yield up our temporal property, we at the same time deliver the conscience into bondage.” - John Witherspoon, The Dominion of Providence Over the Passions of Men, 1776

“Nevertheless, to the persecution and tyranny of his cruel ministry we will not tamely submit -- appealing to Heaven for the justice of our cause, we determine to die or be free ....” - Joseph Warren, American account of the Battle of Lexington, 1775

“Our country is in danger, but not to be despaired of. Our enemies are numerous and powerful; but we have many friends, determining to be free, and heaven and earth will aid the resolution. On you depend the fortunes of America. You are to decide the important question, on which rest the happiness and liberty of millions yet unborn. Act worthy of yourselves.” - Joseph Warren, Boston Massacre Oration, 1775

"At the same time, the candid citizen must confess that if the policy of the Government upon vital questions affecting the whole people is to be irrevocably fixed by decisions of the Supreme Court, the instant they are made in ordinary litigation between parties in personal actions the people will have ceased to be their own rulers, having to that extent practically resigned their Government into the hands of that eminent tribunal." - Abraham Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address, Monday, March 4, 1861

“Proclaim liberty throughout the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.” - Leviticus 25:10 inscription on the Liberty Bell

“I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” - Nathan Hale, before being hanged by the British, September 22, 1776

“Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom of Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of the people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any band of regular troops that can be, on any pretence, raised in the United States.” - Noah Webster, An Examination of the Leading Principles of the Federal Constitution, October 10, 1787

“All good men wish the entire abolition of slavery, as soon as it can take place with safety to the public, and for the lasting good of the present wretched race of slaves. The only possible step that could be taken towards it by the convention was to fix a period after which they should not be imported.” - Oliver Ellsworth, The Landholder, December 10, 1787

“I believe a time will come when an opportunity will be offered to abolish this lamentable evil. Everything we do is to improve it, if it happens in our day; if not, let us transmit to our descendants, together with our slaves, a pity for their unhappy lot and an abhorrence of slavery.” - Patrick Henry on slavery in a letter to Robert Pleasants, January 18, 1773

“[I]f you speak of solid information and sound judgement, Colonel Washington is, unquestionably the greatest man on that floor.” - Patrick Henry, on George Washington, 1775

“Eloquence has been defined to be the art of persuasion. If it included persuasion by convincing, Mr. Madison was the most eloquent man I ever heard.” - Patrick Henry, on James Madison

“I am not a Virginian, but an American.” - Patrick Henry, speech in the First Continental Congress, 1774

“It is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth -- and listen to the song of that syren, till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those, who having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it might cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it.” - Patrick Henry, speech in the Virginia Convention, 1775

“The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave.” - Patrick Henry, speech in the Virginia Convention, 1775

“Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined.” - Patrick Henry, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 5, 1778

“O sir, we should have fine times, indeed, if, to punish tyrants, it were only sufficient to assemble the people! Your arms, wherewith you could defend yourselves, are gone; and you have no longer an aristocratical, no longer a democratical spirit. Did you ever read of any revolution in a nation, brought about by the punishment of those in power, inflicted by those who had no power at all?” - Patrick Henry, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 5, 1778

“Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God. I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!” - Patrick Henry, speech in the Virginia Convention, 1775

“Liberty, the greatest of all earthly blessings -- give us that precious jewel, and you may take every thing else! Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel.” - Patrick Henry, speech in the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 5, 1778

“There is a time for all things, a time to preach and a time to pray, but those times have passed away. There is a time to fight, and that time has now come.” - Peter Muhlenberg, from a Lutheran sermon read at Woodstock, Virginia, January 1776

“Resolved: That these colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states, that they are absolved of all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved. That it is expedient forthwith to take the most effectual measures for forming foreign Alliances. That a plan of confederation be prepared and transmitted to the respective colonies for their consideration and approbation.” - Richard Lee, Resolution in Congress, June 7, 1776

“It is of great importance to set a resolution, not to be shaken, never to tell an untruth. There is no vice so mean, so pitiful, so contemptible; and he who permits himself to tell a lie once, finds it much easier to do it a second and a third time, till at length it becomes habitual; he tells lies without attending to it, and truths without the world's believing him. This falsehood of the tongue leads to that of the heart, and in time depraves all its good disposition.” - Thomas Jefferson

“It behooves you, therefore, to think and act for yourself and your people. The great principles of right and wrong are legible to every reader; to pursue them requires not the aid of many counselors. The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest. Only aim to do your duty, and mankind will give you credit where you fail.” - Thomas Jefferson, A Summary View of the Rights of British America, 1775

“For Heaven's sake discard the monstrous wig which makes the English judges look like rats peeping through bunches of oakum.” - Thomas Jefferson, commenting on judges' apparel

“The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions, that I wish it to be always kept alive. It will often be exercised when wrong, but better so than not to be exercised at all. I like a little rebellion now and then. It is like a storm in the atmosphere.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to Abigail Adams, February 22, 1787

“The example of changing a constitution by assembling the wise men of the state, instead of assembling armies, will be worth as much to the world as the former examples we had give them. The constitution, too, which was the result of our deliberation, is unquestionably the wisest ever yet presented to men.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to David Humphreys, March 18, 1789

“The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to E. Carrington, May 27, 1788

“The foundation on which all [constitutions] are built is the natural equality of man, the denial of every preeminence but that annexed to legal office, and particularly the denial of a preeminence by birth.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to George Washington, 1784

“But with respect to future debt; would it not be wise and just for that nation to declare in the constitution they are forming that neither the legislature, nor the nation itself can validly contract more debt, than they may pay within their own age, or within the term of 19 years.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to James Madison, September 6, 1789

“Natural rights [are] the objects for the protection of which society is formed and municipal laws established.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to James Monroe, 1791

“I think all the world would gain by setting commerce at perfect liberty.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Adams, July 7, 1785

“It is a happy circumstance in human affairs that evils which are not cured in one way will cure themselves in some other.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Sinclair, 1791

“Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time, who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done, if we are always doing. And that you may be always doing good, my dear, is the ardent prayer of yours affectionately.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to Martha Jefferson, May 5, 1787

“A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, August 19, 1785

“Give up money, give up fame, give up science, give the earth itself and all it contains rather than do an immoral act. And never suppose that in any possible situation, or under any circumstances, it is best for you to do a dishonorable thing, however slightly so it may appear to you ... From the practice of the purest virtue, you may be assured you will derive the most sublime comforts in every moment of life, and in the moment of death.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, August 19, 1785

“The republican is the only form of government which is not eternally at open or secret war with the rights of mankind.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Hunter

“What signify a few lives lost in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.” - Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Stephens Smith, 1787

“But of all the views of this law none is more important, none more legitimate, than that of rendering the people the safe, as they are the ultimate, guardians of their own liberty. For this purpose the reading in the first stage, where they will receive their whole education, is proposed, as has been said, to be chiefly historical. History by apprising them of the past will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify them as judges of the actions and designs of men; it will enable them to know ambition under every disguise it may assume; and knowing it, to defeat its views.” - Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 14, 1781

“History by apprising [citizens] of the past will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify them as judges of the actions and designs of men; it will enable them to know ambition under every disguise it may assume; and knowing it, to defeat its views.” - Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 14, 1781

“The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. But it does me no injury for my neighbour to say there are twenty gods, or no god. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.” - Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 17, 1782

“There must doubtless be an unhappy influence on the manners of our people produced by the existence of slavery among us. The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other. Our children see this, and learn to imitate it; for man is an imitative animal. This quality is the germ of all education in him.” - Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 18, 1781

“It is the manners and spirit of a people which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution.” - Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 19, 1781

“On every unauthoritative exercise of power by the legislature must the people rise in rebellion or their silence be construed into a surrender of that power to them? If so, how many rebellions should we have had already?” - Thomas Jefferson, Notes on Virginia, Query 12, 1782

“It is an established rule of construction, where a phrase will bear either of two meanings to give it that which will allow some meaning to the other parts of the instrument, and not that which will render all the others useless. Certainly no such universal power was meant to be given to them. It was intended to lace them up straitly with in the enumerated powers.” - Thomas Jefferson, Opinion on a National Bank, 1791

“They are not to do anything they please to provide for the general welfare, but only to lay taxes for that purpose. To consider the latter phrase not as describing the purpose of the first, but as giving a distinct and independent power to do any act they please which may be good for the Union, would render all the preceding and subsequent enumerations of power completely useless. It would reduce the whole instrument to a single phrase, that of instituting a Congress with power to do whatever would be for the good of the United States; and as they sole judges of the good or evil, it would be also a power to do whatever evil they please ... Certainly no such universal power was meant to be given them. It was intended to lace them up straightly within the enumerated powers and those without which, as means, these powers could not be carried into effect.” - Thomas Jefferson, Opinion on National Bank, 1791

“Our properties within our own territories [should not] be taxed or regulated by any power on earth but our own.” - Thomas Jefferson, Rights of British America, 1774

“That these are our grievances which we have thus laid before his majesty, with that freedom of language and sentiment which becomes a free people claiming their rights as derived from the laws of nature, and not as the gift of their chief magistrate.” - Thomas Jefferson, Rights of British America, 1774

“The God who gave us life gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them.” - Thomas Jefferson, Rights of British America, 1774

“Now is the seedtime of continental union, faith and honor. The least fracture now, will be like a name engraved with the point of a pin on the tender rind of a young oak; the wound would enlarge with the tree, and posterity read in it full grown characters.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“The cause of America is in a great measure the cause of all mankind.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“The Sun never shined on a cause of greater worth.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“We have it in our power to begin the world over again.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“As parents, we can have no joy, knowing that this government is not sufficiently lasting to ensure any thing which we may bequeath to posterity: And by a plain method of argument, as we are running the next generation into debt, we ought to do the work of it, otherwise we use them meanly and pitifully. In order to discover the line of our duty rightly, we should take our children in our hand, and fix our station a few years farther into life; that eminence will present a prospect, which a few present fears and prejudices conceal from our sight.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“Everything that is right or reasonable pleads for separation. The blood of the slain, the weeping voice of nature cries, 'tis time to part.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one; for when we suffer or are exposed to the same miseries by a government, which we might expect in a country without government, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“The reformation was preceded by the discovery of America, as if the Almighty graciously meant to open a sanctuary to the persecuted in future years, when home should afford neither friendship nor safety.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“This new world hath been the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty from every part of Europe. Hither have they fled, not from the tender embraces of the mother, but from the cruelty of the monster; and it is so far true of England, that the same tyranny which drove the first emigrants from home, pursues their descendants still.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary.” - Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

“He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself.” - Thomas Paine, Dissertation on First Principles of Government

“I consider the war of America against Britain as the country's war, the public's war, or the war of the people in their own behalf, for the security of their natural rights, and the protection of their own property.” - Thomas Paine, On Financing the War, 1782

“Freedom had been hunted round the globe; reason was considered as rebellion; and the slavery of fear had made men afraid to think. But such is the irresistible nature of truth, that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing.” - Thomas Paine, Rights of Man, 1791

“If, from the more wretched parts of the old world, we look at those which are in an advanced stage of improvement, we still find the greedy hand of government thrusting itself into every corner and crevice of industry, and grasping the spoil of the multitude. Invention is continually exercised, to furnish new pretenses for revenues and taxation. It watches prosperity as its prey and permits none to escape without tribute.” - Thomas Paine, Rights of Man, 1791

“I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776

“If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776

“It is the madness of folly, to expect mercy from those who have refused to do justice; and even mercy, where conquest is the object, is only a trick of war; the cunning of the fox is as murderous as the violence of the wolf.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776

“Not all the treasures of the world, so far as I believe, could have induced me to support an offensive war, for I think it murder; but if a thief breaks into my house, burns and destroys my property, and kills or threatens to kill me, or those that are in it, and to "bind me in all cases whatsoever" to his absolute will, am I to suffer it?” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776

“These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776

“Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776

“What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 1, December 19, 1776

“The times that tried men's souls are over -- and the greatest and completest revolution the world ever knew, gloriously and happily accomplished.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 13, 1783

“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 4, September 11, 1777

“We fight not to enslave, but to set a country free, and to make room upon the earth for honest men to live in.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 4, September 11, 1777

“The Grecians and Romans were strongly possessed of the spirit of liberty but not the principle, for at the time they were determined not to be slaves themselves, they employed their power to enslave the rest of mankind.” - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 5, March 21, 1778

“[R]eligion, or the duty which we owe to our creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence; and therefore all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience; and this is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love, and charity towards each other.” - Virginia Bill of Rights, June 12, 1776

“That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot by any compact deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.” - Virginia Bill of Rights, June 12, 1776

“Well known to be the greatest philosopher of the present age; -- all the operations of nature he seems to understand, -- the very heavens obey him, and the Clouds yield up their Lightning to be imprisoned in his rod.” - William Pierce on Benjamin Franklin, 1787

"There is no such thing in America as an independent press. You know it and I know it. There is not one of you who dares write his honest opinions, and if you did you know beforehand that it would never appear in print. I am paid... for keeping my honest opinions out of the paper ... others of you are paid similar salaries for similar things... any of you who would be so foolish as to write his honest opinions would be out on the streets looking for another job... We are the tools and vassals of rich men behind the scenes. We are the jumping jacks; they pull the strings and we dance. Our talents, possibilities, and lives are all the property of other men. We are intellectual prostitutes." John Swinton - Editorial Freedom in Capital's World http://editorfreedom.com/

"It is incompatible to be dishonest in one area of one's life and honest in another" Deanna Spingola

 

Comments from Nixon (we are not necessarily a fan of Nixon, however, wise perception is wise perception no matter whom it comes from)

In 1945 most Japanese farmers tilled the fields owned by absentee land-lords.  Yoshida's government devised a sweeping land reform bill.  By 1950 90% of Japan's farmland was owned by the farmers themselves.  The Macarthur land reform gave farmers both a sense of individual worth and an incentive to produce more.  After it was completed, communism in Japan became almost entirely an urban phenomenon because Macarthur had stolen the Communist's big rural issue.

It is also ironic that the Taiwan "economic miracle", which can be compared in character and not in size to the Japanese "miracle", was made possible in large by Chang Kai-sheik's liberal land reform program" - Richard Nixon - Leagers P115.

"I expressed my firm conviction that "Japan must not become and economic giant and remain a military and poitical pigmy".  As he had in 1953, Yoshida politely but firmly truned my suggestion aside" - Nixon - Leaders P125

"During the 1950's and early 1960's, when it was clear MacArthur would probably never hold another public office, he often lecture me about balancing the budget, cutting taxes and going back to the gold standard" - Nixon - Leaders P129

"Israel has won all the ward is has fought with the Arabs to date, and will win the next one.  But in the end, they cannot survive in a sea of hate" - de Gaulle (Source Nixon - Leaders P66)

"We don't get to pick and choose what laws to follow." – a county Sheriff "I entirely agree with you we are bound by our oath of office to uphold the Constitution.". - Sheriff Richard Mack.

"You had better be dam sacred if your government want's to take care of your health care, because they will." - Sheriff Richard Mack

See also Sayings Of Clive

C-Live, Love Oppose Evil. Novus Ordo Seclorum.