U.S. Judicial Branch

The role of the Judicial Branch of the U.S. Government is defined in Article III of the Constitution of the U.S.A.

The judiciary is expressly prohibited from making law.

The judiciary is here to administer the courts.

There is no need for the judiciary to interpret the law as Common Law mandates that law must be simple enough to be understood by the common man, thus if a law is ambiguous or not easily understood the function of the judiciary is not to try and interpret some meaning for the law, but only to send the law back to Congress.

The Judicial branch is meant to act as a barrier or wall between the government and the people.  However, most judges get appointed by politicians and are beholden to the government.

Raw DOJ statistics showing that the U.S. has more people in jail, prison and on probation than the rest of the world combined is proof enough that the Judicial Branch has completely and utterly failed the people.

Known criminals are repeatedly being put on the bench, while the everyday behavior of the judiciary can only be described as criminal and treasonous.  Judges have taken it upon themselves to make new law through the misconstrued Common Law principle of precedence.  Precedence under Common Law reflects the will of the people and not that of a judge.

Judges have eliminated Trial by Jury in the U.S. by insisting that they have a right to judge and decide what evidence may or may not be put before the jury.  In so doing the judges rig  the outcome of the trial by controlling the jury's access to evidence.  Judges also regularly strike the testimony of witnesses, thus literally fixing what the jury rules on.

A classic example of how a jury should operate is a Grand Jury where there is no judicial influence. In a trial by Jury the jury is the judge and there is no need for a judge.  However, even in the case of Grand Juries, the government has put their evil hands in to control and corrupt the outcome of Grand Juries.  District Attorneys now step in to Grand Juries and dictate what happens.

"The judicial branch has only one duty --- to lay the article of the Constitution which is involved beside the statue which is challenged and to decide whether the latter squares with the former. . .the only power it (the Court) has. . .is the power of judgment." - U.S. V. BUTLER, 297 US (1936)